Following the victory of Donald Trump in the US elections, President-Elect Trump has to actually fulfil his promises. One of his biggest stance was a plan to deport millions of undocumented people living in the United States. Despite all his rhetoric, the question is whether he can actually accomplish his wishes during one or two terms. As an immigration lawyer, I have analyzed the possibilities of this endeavor in the following video.

In this new video we are going to analyze the issues and the hurdles he is going to face in actually deporting the so-called “illegals”!

#1 – Using the existing immigration court system for deportation. The system is clogged and takes several years to clear.

#2 – Taping into existing databases such as DACA or other relevant DHS databases.

#3 – Giving an opportunity of cancellation those on removal proceedings.

#4 – Congress fighting back.

#5 – Possible riots and demonstrations all the US including a civil war.

The above is purely my opinion based on the practice of immigration law. However, as mentioned in my previous videos, there are possible means he can actually expedite such removals.

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Shah Peerally is an attorney licensed in California practicing immigration law and debt settlement. He has featured as an expert legal analyst for many TV networks such as NDTV, Times Now and Sitarree TV. Articles about Shah Peerally and his work have appeared on newspapers such as San Jose Mercury News, Oakland Tribune, US Fiji Times, Mauritius Le Quotidien, Movers & Shakers and other prominent international newspapers. His work has been commended by Congress women Nancy Pelosi and Barbara Lee. He has a weekly radio show on KLOK 1170AM and frequently participates in legal clinics in churches, temples and mosques. His law group, Shah Peerally Law Group, has represented clients all over the United States constantly dealing with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), Immigration and Custom Enforcement(ICE) and CBP (Customs Border Patrol (CBP) under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). This department was formerly known as the Immigration and Nationality Services (INS).